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Discontinuation and Nonpublication of Head and Neck Cancer Randomized Clinical Trials

This systematic review assesses the rate of discontinuation or nonpublication of phase 3 and 4 randomized clinical trials involving patients with head and neck cancer. Original Article…

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New contributor to age-related hearing loss identified

Researchers have discovered a new potential contributor to age-related hearing loss, a finding that could help doctors identify people at risk and better treat the condition. Original Article…

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A Painless Retroauricular Mass

A 31-year-old Hispanic woman had a 3-year history of a steadily growing, increasingly pruritic, painless mass behind the right ear. The T1-weighted postcontrast magnetic resonance imaging of the head and neck showed a heterogeneously enhancing mass with irregular borders in the right retroauricular space. What is your diagnosis? Original Article…

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The sweet spot: Scientists discover taste center of human brain

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a new method of statistical analysis, researchers have discovered the taste center in the human brain by uncovering which parts of the brain distinguish different types of tastes. Original Article…

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Complicated Blastomycosis of the Skull Base Presenting as Otitis Media

This case report describes a man in his 50s with diabetes mellitus who presented with 2 months of right-sided aural fullness and tinnitus without fever or pain and was subsequently diagnosed with Blastomyces dermatitidis–associated skull base osteomyelitis. Original Article…

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How our body ‘listens’ to vibrations

We all know the feeling of a mobile phone vibrating in our hands. We perceive these vibrations so clearly thanks to specialized receptors that transduce them into neural signals sent to our brain. But how does the latter encode their physical characteristics? Neuroscientists have discovered that feeling a phone vibrate or hearing it ring is ultimately based on the same brain codes. Original Article…

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Comparative Outcomes of Treatment Options for Patients With Idiopathic Subglottic Stenosis

This cohort study of 810 patients with idiopathic subglottic stenosis compares the outcomes of the 3 most common surgical treatment procedures: endoscopic dilation, endoscopic resection with adjuvant medication, or cricotracheal resection. Original Article…

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Hearing loss before 50 may mean higher risk of drug and alcohol issues

People under age 50 with hearing loss misuse prescription opioids at twice the rate of their hearing peers, and are also more likely to misuse alcohol and other drugs, a new national study finds. This means that health care providers may need to take special care when treating pain and mental health conditions in deaf and hard-of-hearing young adults, the researchers say. Original Article…

What If a Stapedectomy Were Not Cost-effective?

The management of otosclerosis is viewed by many as the sine qua non of an otologic practice. From the elegant otopathologic descriptions by Ádám Politzer in the 19th century to surgical breakthroughs by Julius Lempert and John Shea Jr in the mid-20th century, otosclerosis and its surgical management have inspired generations of students, researchers, and surgeons alike. The allure of stapedectomy may be, in part, the elegant tightrope walk to fix hearing loss along with the anticipation of a surgeon report card that arrives in the form of an audiogram. Although the surgical treatment of otosclerosis has not drastically changed since its description by Shea, otosclerosis and its management remain fertile ground for research, debate, and refinement. Indeed, novel 21st-century diagnoses—such as superior canal dehiscence syndrome; technological refinements, including otoendoscopy; and even inner-ear drug delivery—appear to be viewed in connection to otosclerosis. Original Article…

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People ‘hear’ flashes due to disinhibited flow of signals around the brain, suggests study

A synaesthesia-like effect in which people ‘hear’ silent flashes or movement, such as in popular ‘noisy GIFs’ and memes, could be due to a reduction of inhibition of signals that travel between visual and auditory areas of the brain, according to a new study. It was also found that musicians taking part in the study were significantly more likely to report experiencing visual ear than non-musician participants. Original Article…